Jan
27
    
Posted (Naza) in Diagnosed on January-27-2008

Certain findings on chest x-rays (see the section, “How Is Malignant Mesothelioma Diagnosed?”) that suggest asbestos exposure could prompt the need for further tests or close follow-up. However, the chest x-ray is not an effective test for early detection of mesothelioma in the general population. One test being studied is a blood test that measures the levels in the blood of osteopontin, a protein that is elevated in people who have lung damage due to asbestos. It is even higher if a person develops mesothelioma.



 
Jan
21
    
Posted (Naza) in Treatment on January-21-2008

The best way to prevent mesothelioma is to prevent or limit your exposure to asbestos in homes, in public buildings, and at work. People who may be exposed to asbestos at work include miners, factory workers, insulation manufacturers, railroad workers, ship builders, gas mask manufacturers, and construction workers, particularly those involved with insulation. If there is a possibility of on-the-job exposure, such as renovating old buildings, then you should use all protective equipment, work practices, and safety procedures designed for working around asbestos.

mask1.jpg

If you live in an older home, there may be asbestos-containing insulation or other materials. A knowledgeable expert can check your home to determine if there is any asbestos and if it poses any risk of exposure. This may involve testing the air for asbestos levels. It is often more dangerous to remove the materials containing asbestos than to leave them alone. You may then decide to have the asbestos removed from your home. You should hire a qualified contractor to perform this job, to avoid contaminating your home further or causing any exposure to the workers. You should not attempt to remove asbestos-containing material yourself.



 
Jan
21
    
Posted (Naza) in Cause on January-21-2008

Asbestos exposure is the main cause of mesothelioma. After these fibers are breathed in, they travel to the ends of small air passages and reach the pleura where they damage mesothelial cells. The damage they cause is through inflammation and scarring as well as stimulating the growth of these cells. Finally, they may damage DNA and cause changes that result in uncontrolled growth. In addition, they also cause injury to lung cells that can result in lung cancer and/or asbestosis (replacement of lung tissue by scar tissue). If swallowed, these fibers can reach the abdominal cavity where they have a role in causing peritoneal mesothelioma.

Researchers are studying exactly how asbestos causes mesothelial cells to develop into mesothelioma. It is still not known whether the SV40 virus participates in this process.

mcr075a.jpg